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VICTORIA GALLERY
3 Estate Yard Cottage, 
Cholmondeley Park
Malpas
Cheshire
SY14 8HA
Tel: 01829 720035

Sporting Art c1880-2010. Cecil Aldin and his contemporaries. Originals, prints, bronze sculptures and memorabilia.

www.victoriagallery.co.uk

ROUNTREE FINE ART
Specialists in sporting, maritime and topographical paintings from the 18th century to the present day.

118 Fulham Road Chelsea London SW3 6HU
Tel: +44(0)207 370 3939
Fax: +44(0)560 342 7562

www.rountreefineart.com

SOTHERBY'S
We're very grateful to Sotheby's for their very generous sponsorship of the British Sporting Art Trust website.

www.sothebys.com

THE TRYON GALLERY - GOLDEN JUBILEE
7 Bury Street, London SW1Y 6LA
0207 839 8083

www.tryon.co.uk

THE SLADMORE GALLERY
57 Jermyn Street, London SW1Y 6LX
0207 629 1144

www.sladmore.com

PETER VILLA FINE ART
110 East 57th Street
New York 10022. 212-371-1196

Monday to Friday - by appointment. Fine British and American Sporting Paintings from the 18th through 21st centuries.

​ww.peterlvillafineart.com 

THE GALLERY IN CORK STREET
28 Cork Street
London W1S 3NG
0207 287 8408

www.galleryincorkstreet.com

JAMES HARVEY BRITISH ART GALLERY
15 Langton Street, Chelsea, London SW10 0JL
0207 352 0015

www.jamesharveybritishart.com

THE BRIDGEMAN ART LIBRARY

www.bridgemanart.com

RED FOX FINE ART
PO Box 385 Middleburg
VA20118 (540) 687-5780

Fine paintings & Sculpture, 1750-1950

www.redfoxfineart.com

What is sporting art?

‘Sporting art’ is a relatively modern term. It is traditionally understood to refer to a genre of art that encompasses country pursuits, predominantly in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. However, when these paintings were first produced they were more commonly referred to as ‘animal pictures’. They document the popular rural sports of the time including fox hunting, game shooting, fishing and horseracing. The works were often commissioned by those who took part in the sports, and they would commonly be displayed in the owner’s country house as confirmation of their participation and sporting successes. By this definition, the genre experienced a slight decline in the later nineteenth century when the world it documented began to change. Industrialisation caused people to move from the countryside into the towns and cities. Where traditional sporting art documented the importance of country pursuits and the rural lifestyle, the focus was shifting away from both. 

However, sporting art can be understood to have a much wider artistic and historic scope. Perhaps the genre can also be seen to encompass all types of sport, both amateur and professional, from archery to football and cycling to motor racing. By this broad definition, sporting art can be seen to encompass the hawking and hunting tapestries made during the Tudor era all the way up to current day representations of and artistic responses to contemporary sports. Rather than a decline in the late nineteenth century, sporting art diversified, reflecting the participation of an increasingly varied public, which even included women, in an ever-expanding variety of activities. From the late nineteenth century onwards, sporting art documents the creation of a number of new sports including football and rugby. By this more expansive definition, the genre can be seen to document the social history of nineteenth-century industrial Britain.

Sporting art continues to thrive and evolve in the 21st century with contemporary artists provoking questions about the shape of the genre and the ways in which we can define a sporting artist today.